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Peter Cerruti
440 South West End Blvd, RT 309
Quakertown  PA 18951
 Phone: 215-429-7273
Office Phone: 215-538-4400
Fax: 267-354-6992 
petecerruti@yahoo.com
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Peter Cerruti

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How to Keep Your Water Clean

August 18, 2017 12:48 am

We think about keeping our homes clean and our clothes clean, but how often do you stop to consider the cleanliness of your water?

"Lakes, rivers, and streams are significant resources that the U.S. relies on heavily as principal sources of water," says Tommy Webber, owner of T. Webber Plumbing, Heating & Air Conditioning. "We may use these water sources recreationally, but we take them for granted. Neglect, pollution, and overuse has put the water quality in danger.  

With that in mind, Webber offers residents these tips for cleaning up water.

Use a rain barrel – During the summer months, garden and lawn watering make up about 40 percent of a household's total water consumption. If your state allows it. Webber recommends using rain barrels to collect runoff from rooftops and use that to water lawns and gardens.

Wash the car on the lawn – Several of the soaps and detergents that are used to wash cars contain phosphorus and other nutrients that may be good for the grass, but may not be so good for our water sources. By washing the car on the lawn, the runoff goes into the ground as opposed to storm drains where the harmful chemicals will negatively impact lakes and rivers.

Properly dispose of pollutants – Used motor oil, antifreeze, paint, roof tar, rechargeable batteries, unused fertilizer, unused medication and other similar contaminants can be recycled at the Wheelabrator solid waste plant. This will prevent these dangerous substances from entering the water supply.

Pick up pet waste – One ounce of dog waste contains 23 million microorganisms of disease-causing fecal coliform bacteria. Either flush your pet's droppings or put it in the garbage.

Put trash where it belongs -- Recycle, reuse or put it in the garbage. Plastic does not decompose and can harm many animals and fish as well as pollute the water.

Have the water tested by a professional – Some residents rely on private wells for their water source. Unlike public water systems which are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), private wells are not. Households that use private wells need to take special precautions to ensure the water that enters their home is safe for their families. Homeowners that are concerned about the safety of their water should contact a professional to test the water. Once the water is tested, and any contaminants are identified, the expert can recommend a water treatment system to improve the water quality and provide peace of mind.

Source:T. Webber Plumbing, Heating & Air Conditioning

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Safely Photograph an Eclipse

August 18, 2017 12:48 am

With August 21 on the horizon, residents across the country are gearing up to witness the first total eclipse since 1979. However, according to The American Academy of Ophthalmology, there is one thing that sets this month's total eclipse apart from others: Smartphones. Millions of ordinary people are expected to use smartphones and digital cameras to photograph this eclipse. Eye care professionals are concerned that first-timers might train their cameras on this phenomenon, unaware of the damage they can do to their eyes.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Academy of Optometry teamed up to offer the follow tips on how to safely photograph an eclipse:

Buy a solar filter or modify your eclipse glasses to function as a solar filter for your smartphone. Cut your glasses in half and tape one eyepiece over your smartphone camera lens.

Take the filter off during totality. Totality is when the moon entirely blocks the sun's bright face. The path of totality for the Aug. 21 eclipse stretches from Oregon to South Carolina. Unless you're in the path of totality, keep your solar eclipse glasses on throughout the eclipse.

Use a tripod to keep your camera stable.

Use a remote trigger. With a remote, you can adjust settings and shoot the photo while keeping your camera stable.

Practice. Take photos just after sunset during twilight to get an idea of what the light levels will be like during totality.

Shoot photos of the moon to learn how to manually adjust the focus on your camera. Tap the screen and hold your finger on the image of the moon to lock the focus. Then slide your finger up or down to darken or lighten the exposure.

A telephoto lens system is a must-have for eclipse photography with a smartphone. There are zoom lenses for smartphones designed solely to provide magnification without resorting to digital zoom.

Try the pinhole effect. This eclipse effect is easily captured with point-and-shoot cameras. Use a straw hat or a kitchen sieve and allow the sun's shadow to fall on a piece of white cardboard placed several feet away. The small holes act like pinhole cameras and each one projects its own image of the eclipsed sun.

Make sure you purchase solar eclipse filters and glasses from reputable manufacturers. There have been reports that some companies are selling counterfeit products labeled as if they conform to international safety standards.

Source:  www.aaopt.org.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Learning the ABCs of FICO

August 17, 2017 12:48 am

Most people don’t think too much about their FICO scores until they want to get a loan. But no matter the type of loan you want – mortgage, new car, or whatever – the higher your  FICO score, the more likely you’ll be approved.

Understanding the five factors that make up your scores can be the first step toward improving them. Financial experts at the Motley Fool break down where your scores come from and suggest a few ways to improve them:

Know where your FICO score comes from:

Payment history. Thirty-five percent of your score is determined by whether you pay your bills on time every month.

Credit utilization ratio. Thirty percent reflects your credit utilization ratio – the percentage of available credit you're using. Using less than 30 percent of your available credit can help your credit score.

Length of credit history. Fifteen percent reflects the length of your credit history. Paying bills consistently over time can definitely work in your favor.

New accounts. Ten percent of your score is based on the number of accounts you open. Opening too many new accounts simultaneously suggests you're highly reliant on borrowing to keep up with your expenses.

Credit mix. Ten percent reflects the types of accounts you have. Credit bureaus make a distinction between your credit card accounts versus student loans, car loans, and mortgages.

Three ways to improve your FICO:
Pay off a chunk of your balance. If you carry a balance, pay off as much as you can, even if it means you must work a second job or sell off stuff you no longer need or use.  

Ask for a raise in credit limit. If you’ve paid your bills consistently, this may not be difficult to get – and since your credit utilization ratio carries significant weight, that should help to improve your overall score.

Correct reporting errors. It's estimated that 20 percent of credit reports contain errors. If you spot one on yours – such as an error in the amount you owe or a paid-off account not shown – getting it corrected will almost certainly boost your score. Review your FICO score for free once each year and make sure it's accurate.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Energy Costs Unveiled

August 17, 2017 12:48 am

In a previous segment, I started unpacking the latest Consumer Energy Alliance (CEA) study of energy consumption across the country, which paints a fascinating picture of who is paying what for their energy, and why it costs so much - or in some regions - so little.

The study cites the Energy Information Administration (EIA) pegging Midwesterners among those paying more for their electricity than the average American households in other parts of the country.

It also impacts the amount of money Americans pay for produce everywhere, since adequate energy delivery infrastructure is vital to keep crops, farmers, and the Midwest economy moving.

The CEA says maintaining an adequate power supply is crucial to six of the nation’s top 18 agricultural producing states in the region, including Minnesota, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Indiana, which are among the top 10.

The CEA study illustrates a number of compelling implications about energy delivery in the Midwest:

- The bottom 20 percent of earners spend almost 10 percent of their income solely on electricity, more than seven times the portion of income that the top fifth pays.

- Of those low-income earners that spend 10 percent of their income on power bills, 50 percent of them are African-American families.

- Citizens at or near the poverty level are disproportionately impacted, and the U.S. Census Bureau data estimates that more than 7.8 million people in the Midwest live at or below the poverty line.

- Of the 43.3 million people on food stamps nationwide, more than 6.8 million reside in the Midwest. (In Illinois, 15 percent of residents depend on food stamps.)

The report finds the electricity grid is not serving these communities, resulting in a “reliability gap” of 44.8 percent is something that the poor, young people, seniors and hard-working families in the Midwest can’t afford.

Adding to the stress, based on information from the EIA, the Midwest region would be one of the most impacted by a predicted 46 percent energy shortfall by 2030.  

The CEA report says the current lack of a quorum at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is holding back the federal approval of an estimated $50 billion in major energy delivery projects, including those that would secure energy and economic security for Midwest families and businesses.

So it's important for Midwest residents of that region to stay informed about energy grid developments close to home. For those in other regions, stay tuned as we continue unpacking CEA's energy data for your part of the country.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Ways to Make Air Travel More Tolerable

August 17, 2017 12:48 am

From endless security lines to cramped cabins, flying these days can feel far from glamorous. Here are some tips for making airline travel less stressful and maybe even a little enjoyable.

Build in more time. With stepped-up security requirements and packed flights, airports are getting more crowded and lines are getting longer and moving more slowly. Like it or not, this means you have to leave for the airport earlier to guarantee smooth travels. Tack on at least an additional half an hour - an hour is even better. Should you find yourself with time to spare at the airport, treat yourself to a relaxing meal, a shoe shine or mini massage.

Reserve correctly. When booking your flight, make sure the name on your ticket reads exactly as your license or passport. Middle initials - or lack thereof - matter, as do full names, i.e., Joe vs. Joseph. Any discrepancies can set you back at security and possibly cause you to miss your flight.

Check in online. Don’t skip the chance to check in online the night before and print your boarding pass at home or send it to your mobile phone. This will allow you to eliminate at least one line and go straight to bag drop or security if you only have a carry-on bag.

Carry on responsibly. Make sure your carry-on luggage can actually fit in the overhead compartment. Don’t hold up departure as you try to cram in a too-large bag. If in doubt, just check it. And make packing light your golden rule.

Know the security drill. Ditch your liquids, wear slip-on shoes, and empty your pockets well before getting in the security line. If you’re traveling with a laptop, remember to remove it and place it in a separate bin. If you have metal in your body, alert the TSA agent and have the necessary medical documentation.

If you happen to be looking for real estate information, feel free to contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Mortgages Are Going to the Dogs

August 17, 2017 12:48 am

A third of millennial-aged Americans (ages 18 to 36) who purchased their first home say the desire to have a better space or yard for a dog influenced their decision, according to a recent survey conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of SunTrust Mortgage, a division of SunTrust Banks, Inc. Dogs ranked among the top three motivators for first-time home purchasers and were cited by more millennials as reasons for buying a home than marriage/upcoming marriage (25 percent) or the birth/expected birth of a child (19 percent).

Only the desire for more living space (66 percent), and the opportunity to build equity (36 percent), were identified by more millennials as reasons they purchased their first home.

According to Dorinda Smith, SunTrust Mortgage president and CEO, renting can be expensive and stressful for dog owners, making homeownership a better living situation.

Among millennials who have never purchased a home, 42 percent say that their dog – or the desire to have one – is a key factor in their desire to buy a home in the future, suggesting dogs will also influence purchase decisions of potential first-time homebuyers.

SunTrust offers the following tips when considering a first-time home purchase:

Understand your initial expenses. The down payment and closing costs can really add up, but don't forget to budget for moving expenses. These include everything from truck rental to setting up water, power, cable, internet and more.

Organize your finances. While there are different types of loans for different needs, your finances will be thoroughly evaluated during the credit application. Make sure they are organized so you can better retrieve them throughout the application process.

Get pre-qualified. Lenders can use your income and credit history to give you an estimate of the home loan amount for which you qualify. The pre-qualification amount can be a helpful guideline when you are considering which properties to purchase.

Create a realistic timeline. Even with a pre-qualification, loans can take weeks to be finalized. Work with a loan officer to decide the best type of loan for your situation and make sure your loan will be ready in advance of your closing.

For more information about preparing to buy a home, please contact me.

Source: SunTrust Banks, Inc.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Tips for Millennials Buying Homes

August 17, 2017 12:48 am

Are you, or someone you know, a millennial currently dreaming about your first home? Is something holding you back?According to a survey conducted by loanDepot, 52 percent of Millennials  cite no longer wanting to pay rent and being ready to start a family as two top drivers motivating them to start looking into home ownership. However, according to the survey, half of those are anxious about the expense of real estate and mortgage payments, with only 18 percent saying they think a home purchase is affordable for them.

"It's clear from the survey results that Millennials have a lot of anxiety built up about the home-buying process," says David Norris, loanDepot's Head of Retail Lending. "There is good news, however, as there's more flexibility than most Millennials think regarding how to qualify for a loan and what's needed for a down payment."
Top tips for Millennials from loanDepot lending professionals around the country include:

Know how much is needed for down payment

According to survey results, Millennials are unsure how much down payment they need to put down, with the average coming out to 32 percent. And while the industry standard is typically 20 percent down payment, there are other options.

John Pearson, a loanDepot licensed lending officer based in Hoboken, N.J., says there are many programs for first time homebuyers (FTHB) that allow them to finance a property with 10 percent, 5 percent, or even 3 percent down. There are also loan assistance programs offered by FHA that many don't realize their can qualify for.

"The best advice I have for young buyers is to not believe everything you read on the Internet," Pearson says. "When talking with a professional, you can discuss your specific financial situation and the lending officer can help you determine how much down you'll need and what a monthly mortgage payment will look like. You'll probably discover you don't have to wait until you reach the point of a 20 percent down payment."

Don't be surprised by closing costs

According to Marc Bui, retail lending manager for loanDepot in Newport Beach, Calif., many Millennials he works with don't realize there are costs beyond the down payment required to close.

"When I'm working with today's youngest buyers, I help them plan for all final costs, which can include HOA (homeowners' association) fees, property taxes, private mortgage insurance (PMI) for those putting less than 20 percent down, title, appraisal, etc. It's important to understand everything that goes into closing so there are no unpleasant surprises," Bui says.

Include parents but listen to professionals with an open mind

About 54 percent of Millennials say they plan to ask their parents about how to buy a home, with slightly fewer at 52 percent saying they'd first turn to a mortgage broker or company.

"It's great when young home buyers include their parents in the process," says Scott Nadler, a top 1 percent licensed lending officer in the U.S. and based in loanDepot's Manhattan office. "When young couples come to me wanting to buy their first home, many times I'll suggest a 7- or 10-year adjustable mortgage, which allows them to build equity while having a lower monthly mortgage payment. Many parents are nervous about adjustable mortgages but if someone plans to trade up in a few years, they will be out of the mortgage before the adjustment. My best advice for Millennials is to make sure they feel comfortable with the product they select."

Student loans may not prohibit a home loan

According to the Urban Institute, student loan debt has increased sharply over the last decade and has surpassed credit card debt. This stressor is a top concern for Millennials who are interested in purchasing a home in the near future.

At the end of April, Fannie Mae announced three policy changes designed to help prospective homeowners struggling with student-loan debt. Two changes help borrowers with high student-loan debt qualify for mortgages while the other policy change helps homeowners refinance their home to pay down their student loans.

Debt paid by others: This change widens borrower eligibility to qualify for a home loan by excluding non-mortgage debt, such as credit cards, auto loans, and student loans, paid by someone else, such as parents.

Student Debt Payment Calculation: This change increases the odds that borrowers with student debt will qualify for a loan by allowing lenders to accept student loan payment information on credit reports.

Student loan cash-out refinance: Fannie now offers homeowners the flexibility to pay off a high-interest rate student loan while potentially refinancing to a lower mortgage rate.

"Some lenders have special programs for borrowers with certain types of student loans," says Mary Bane, vice president, regional production for loanDepot in the Chicagoland area. "Medical professionals with student loans that have been deferred for 12 months or longer can avoid having that debt repayment counted as part of their debt. The assumption is that their income will increase dramatically so they will pay off the debt quickly as soon as they are fully employed."

Another potential option is the 40-year mortgage loan program from loanDepot that requires 10 percent down payment and good credit, but has a 10-year interest-only initial repayment period that could help borrowers tackle their student loan debt while they make lower mortgage payments. The following 30 years are fully amortized.

Source: loanDepot

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Tips for Tackling a DIY Deck Project

August 17, 2017 12:48 am

(Family Features) While planning a new outdoor living space can be overwhelming, chances are there's a home improvement retailer nearby that offers an abundance of resources to help you tackle virtually any project. If a DIY deck project is on your to-do list, these tips can help you navigate the aisles like a pro.

Do your homework. Get started by perusing retailer websites to learn about their product offerings and services. Then visit manufacturer websites for more information and to compare aesthetics and performance. Research your options and decide what materials and styles make the most sense for your lifestyle and preferences. For instance, if you are looking to spend more time enjoying your deck than maintaining it, you may consider a high-performance composite material, like Trex. Unlike wood, composite decking won't rot, warp, crack or splinter, and resists fading, scratching and mold.

Take advantage of retailer resources. After you've decided on a preferred material, your local big-box retailer can help you obtain additional information, design ideas and product samples. In addition to perusing an array of decking options, you also can preview designer-curated railing pairings. Once you find a combination that suits your outdoor space, you can download the materials list to better guide your in-store experience.

Explore the store. Once you have determined the direction of your project and narrowed down your product preferences, orient yourself with the store landscape so you can navigate the merchandise in an order that correlates with your project. It may be easiest to start with decking materials in the lumber aisle and then move to railings, which can typically be found in an adjacent aisle or on an end-cap display. Pay close attention to signage and look carefully for logos to make sure you're finding the brand you want.

Ask an associate. Don't be afraid to ask for help. The staff at your local retailer can provide tips to help you successfully navigate your project and the store. For instance, if the materials you are looking for aren't on the shelves, many options are available via special order. Typically, an associate can arrange for the product you want to arrive in-store in about 10 days. Most stores also offer assistance with installation.

Source: lowes.trex.com  

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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4 Steps for Picking Bathroom Tiles

August 15, 2017 12:48 am

Looking to redo your bathroom? You're likely already thinking about tiling options. Big, small, colored, clear, glass or ceramic - the choices are endless. To help, we've compiled several tips for choosing a better bathroom tile.

Think about versatility. To truly draw your bathroom together, you will likely want a tile that translates to floor and wall. Visualize the tile in each space to make sure it moves seamlessly.

Size matters. Should you go big or small? There is lots to think about. A small tile will call for more grouting (think, more cleaning mold), but a larger tile tends to be slippier if used on a wet floor or in the shower area. However, a smaller tile is good for fitting in unique spaces, such as a built-in shower shelf or bench.

Going glass? Choose wider. Glass tiles can be finicky, as they can show mold or moisture that may squeeze behind the tile during its lifetime. That said, if going with glass, choose a smaller tile so any upcoming imperfections will be less apparent.

Choose for the clean. Be honest: How often do you wish to clean your bathroom? If you enjoy cleaning and do it frequently, small tiles with lots of crannies will be fine for you. If you prefer to clean less frequently, a wider tile--or even a ceramic or glass panel-- may be better for you.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How a Good Real Estate Agent Can Help You Find the Home You Really Want

August 15, 2017 12:48 am

The internet is an invaluable resource when searching for a home to buy. From a great selection of homes in your price range to tools that allow you to store your favorites and alert you to price drops, listing portals offer an array of benefits.

But when it comes to finding your ideal home, nothing compares to working with an expert real estate agent. Here’s why a professional agent can help you uncover the home that’s right for you:

- A good real estate agent is always networking and may know about homes on the market - or coming soon to the market - that you wouldn’t find online yet.
- Agents are experts in the areas and neighborhoods you’re interested in and will, therefore, be able to tell you aspects about a home that you can’t see online - like the noisy neighbors next door, the musty smell in the basement, or the dead tree that poses an imminent threat to the roof.
- When it comes to price, agents will know the particular circumstances of the seller, including if they need to sell in a hurry and are willing to negotiate on price. A home listed online that you thought was out of your price range, might be affordable after all.
- A good agent will be your eyes and ears. Once they get to know you and your needs and tastes, and understand what you’re really looking for in a home, they’ll be able to alert you right away when there’s a home that’s a perfect match.

So while the internet is a great place to begin your home search, be sure to get some recommendations and enlist a great real estate agent once you’ve narrowed down your choices. Their personal guidance and expertise will be critical in helping you find the perfect home at the right price.

If you’re looking for more real estate information, please contact me.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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