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Peter Cerruti
440 South West End Blvd, RT 309
Quakertown  PA 18951
 Phone: 215-429-7273
Office Phone: 215-538-4400
Fax: 267-354-6992 
petecerruti@yahoo.com
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Peter Cerruti

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Weather the Storm Wisely

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

(Family Features)--Summer storm season may bring welcome rain, but some storms are strong enough to pack a dangerous punch. Planning ahead for this year's wicked weather can help ensure you're ready to weather whatever Mother Nature throws at you.

One of the most serious side effects of severe weather is the potential for power loss. In some cases, it can be just a nuisance with little more impact than the time it takes to reset clocks. However, when the outage lasts for hours or days, or when you rely on power for necessities like medical equipment, a power outage can be a major imposition.

Make sure your family is ready for any bad weather ahead this season with these tips:

- Ensure there is a working flashlight in every room, so you can safely navigate no matter what time of day the power fails or where you are. Check the battery terminals for any signs of damage or corrosion, and replace old batteries to give you the fullest charge possible. Also invest in a quality lantern or two, so if you have to hunker down for a while, you can do so with the comfort of some far-reaching light. After all, reading or playing board games is no fun by flashlight.

- If you have advance warning of a coming storm, unplug devices that are especially susceptible to power-related damage, such as TVs and computers. In the event of storms that crop up suddenly or while you're away from home, it's best to keep major electronics like TVs, computers and printers plugged into a surge protector to prevent damage from flickering power or a surge when the power is restored.

- Add a backup power source. Portable generators can provide essential power during a sustained power outage. An option like the Briggs & Stratton Q6500 QuietPower Series inverter generator delivers plenty of power to keep essential appliances and electronics running for up to 14 hours on a single tank of gas.

- Keep a ready supply of non-perishable snacks and drinks. Once the power goes out, you'll want to avoid opening the refrigerator, which releases trapped cold air and reduces the amount of time food will store safely without spoiling. After most perishables are exposed to temperatures over 40 F for two hours, you'll need to discard them, though a full, sealed freezer can hold its temperature for up to 48 hours.

- During a storm, keep the family together in one safe location. That way you can quickly communicate if you need to make an abrupt change, such as taking more protective cover. It also minimizes the possibility of injury from making your way through the home in the dark trying to locate family members.

Severe seasonal storms are the norm across many parts of the country. Planning ahead for potential problems, like power outages, can help ensure you weather the storm safely.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Weather the Storm Wisely

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

(Family Features)--Summer storm season may bring welcome rain, but some storms are strong enough to pack a dangerous punch. Planning ahead for this year's wicked weather can help ensure you're ready to weather whatever Mother Nature throws at you.

One of the most serious side effects of severe weather is the potential for power loss. In some cases, it can be just a nuisance with little more impact than the time it takes to reset clocks. However, when the outage lasts for hours or days, or when you rely on power for necessities like medical equipment, a power outage can be a major imposition.

Make sure your family is ready for any bad weather ahead this season with these tips:

- Ensure there is a working flashlight in every room, so you can safely navigate no matter what time of day the power fails or where you are. Check the battery terminals for any signs of damage or corrosion, and replace old batteries to give you the fullest charge possible. Also invest in a quality lantern or two, so if you have to hunker down for a while, you can do so with the comfort of some far-reaching light. After all, reading or playing board games is no fun by flashlight.

- If you have advance warning of a coming storm, unplug devices that are especially susceptible to power-related damage, such as TVs and computers. In the event of storms that crop up suddenly or while you're away from home, it's best to keep major electronics like TVs, computers and printers plugged into a surge protector to prevent damage from flickering power or a surge when the power is restored.

- Add a backup power source. Portable generators can provide essential power during a sustained power outage. An option like the Briggs & Stratton Q6500 QuietPower Series inverter generator delivers plenty of power to keep essential appliances and electronics running for up to 14 hours on a single tank of gas.

- Keep a ready supply of non-perishable snacks and drinks. Once the power goes out, you'll want to avoid opening the refrigerator, which releases trapped cold air and reduces the amount of time food will store safely without spoiling. After most perishables are exposed to temperatures over 40 F for two hours, you'll need to discard them, though a full, sealed freezer can hold its temperature for up to 48 hours.

- During a storm, keep the family together in one safe location. That way you can quickly communicate if you need to make an abrupt change, such as taking more protective cover. It also minimizes the possibility of injury from making your way through the home in the dark trying to locate family members.

Severe seasonal storms are the norm across many parts of the country. Planning ahead for potential problems, like power outages, can help ensure you weather the storm safely.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Could Your Body Language Be Sabotaging Your Hiring Potential?

June 8, 2017 12:36 am

You meet the criteria, you apply for a gig and you land an interview. But somehow, you keep missing out on the job. Sound familiar? When it comes to landing a job, what you say to a prospective employer may sometimes be less important than how you say it, according to a recent survey from staffing firm OfficeTeam, where senior managers said 30 percent of candidates display negative body language during interviews.

Respondents identified eye contact as the most telling nonverbal cue when meeting with applicants, rating it a 4.18 on a scale of one to five (with five indicating the highest significance). This was followed by facial expressions (3.96).

OfficeTeam offers job seekers five tips for putting their best body language forward during interviews:

Get hands-on. Aim for a handshake that's firm, but doesn't crush the recipient. Limit the duration to a few seconds.

Break out of that slump. Subtly mirror the interviewer's body language and posture. Sit up straight and lean forward slightly to show engagement and confidence.

Put on a happy face. A genuine smile demonstrates warmth and enthusiasm. Conduct a mock interview with a friend to find out if you're unwittingly sending negative nonverbal cues.

Keep your eyes on the prize. Maintain regular eye contact during the meeting, but look away occasionally. Staring may be perceived as aggressive.  

Don't fidget. Resist the urge to shake your legs, tap your fingers or twirl your pen. It's fine to use hand gestures, as long as they're not distracting. Keep your arms uncrossed to appear more open and receptive.

Source: OfficeTeam

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Minimize Moving Stress

June 7, 2017 12:36 am

Among the top stressors is packing. In fact, in a recent survey, commissioned by Duck® brand, conducted online by Harris Poll, 86 percent say packing to move is frustrating. It doesn't have to be this way. Here are some tips to reduce packing pain.

Purge before packing: Diminish the workload by first cleaning out items you no longer need.

Pack carefully: 40 percent of those who would find it frustrating to pack when moving worry about items breaking. Eliminate anxiety by wrapping fragile items with cushioning material, like Bubble Wrap. Dish and glass kits provide pouches and dividers to protect delicate goods. Lastly, secure your boxes with quality packing tape, like EZ Start® Packaging Tape or Duck® MAX Strength Packaging Tape.

Plan ahead: Before you even think about boxing up or hiring movers, take some time to plan in advance. If you need help figuring out exactly what and how many supplies you need to pack up your home, Duck® brand has a new online moving calculator at duckbrand.com. All you have to do is input the number of bedrooms and bathrooms you have, as well as any other rooms and spaces you are packing up (family room, office, closets, basement, etc.) and Duck brand will provide you with a shopping list to print or share. Or, you can simply purchase the recommended moving products right then and there through duckbrand.com.

While moving will always contain some stress, the right moving supplies and strategies can streamline the task of packing.

Source: duckbrand.com/move-ship.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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7 Pool Safety Questions to Ask Yourself

June 7, 2017 12:36 am

Splash! That’s the sound of summer fun as you dive into your beautiful blue pool. But while pools can be relaxing and refreshing, they can also be dangerous.According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, there were an average of 3,536 fatal unintentional drownings per year between 2005 and 2014, which breaks down to about ten deaths per day.

If you own your own pool, it’s important to follow rigid safety guidelines to make sure you, your family and your guests are safe this summer

To start, Doug Zanes, an Arizona accident and injury lawyer, suggests you please ask yourself the following questions:

- Does your pool or spa have a fence around it?
- Are you pool gates self-closing and self-latching?
- Have you installed door, gate, or pool alarms?
- Have you installed anti-entrapment drain covers to protect swimmers?
- Are all pool and spa covers in working order?
- Has your family received CPR training?
- Does everyone in you family know how to swim?

If you own a pool, Zane notes that your answer to all of the above questions should be "yes."  Below, he offers seven safety tips that you must adopt.

Do not allow anyone to swim alone. Swim with a buddy because even adults can have a medical emergency requiring help;

- Your children must be taught basic water safety tips;
- In order to avoid entrapments, keep children away from pool drains;
- When people are using a pool or spa keep a telephone and other pool safety equipment close by;
- Look for any missing children in the pool or spa FIRST;
- An adult should maintain constant supervision of children swimming in the pool. Don't trust the life of a child to another child;
- Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast approved life jackets when in the pool.

Source: http://zaneslaw.com

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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How to Stay Safe at the Dog Park

June 7, 2017 12:36 am

Dog parks are a fun way to socialize your dog, get some exercise, and meet some cute pooches along the way. However, dog parks can also be dangerous, with so many unknown animals thrown into the mix.

As park visits increase during the warm summer months, Nationwide reminds dog owners about the importance of safety when visiting their favorite dog park.

- Obey all posted rules and regulations.

- Visit the dog park without your dog during the days and times you anticipate going to see if the "regulars" are a good fit for your pet.

- Pay attention to your dog at all times and ensure that playtime remains friendly. If your dog or another dog is playing too rough, it's best to remove your dog from the situation.

- Many dog parks have designated areas for large and small dogs. No matter your dog's stature, be sure to keep them in the area allocated for their size.

- Don't bring a puppy younger than 4 months old.

- Make sure your dog is up to date on vaccinations and flea/tick preventive.

- On warm days, avoid the dog park during peak temperature hours.

- Bring water and a bowl for your dog to drink from.

- Look for signs of overheating, including profuse and rapid panting, a bright red tongue, thick drooling saliva, glassy eyes and lack of coordination. If this occurs, take your dog to a veterinarian immediately.

Source: Nationwide pet insurance
 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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6 Ways to Stay Fit with Your Pup

June 6, 2017 12:36 am

(Family Features)--Puppies don't just make great best friends; they're also awesome (and adorable) workout buddies. It's important for both humans and pups to stay active, so the Pedigree brand is sharing fun, interactive tips and hilariously cute videos with fitness inspiration, perfect for owner/puppy bonding.

While you're focused on keeping in shape, it's important to also keep diet top of mind. Below are some tips from Pedigree:

Canines on the Court. Let your pup play doggie defense in a game of backyard basketball. Dribble the ball around and watch your puppy opponent have the time of his life trying to steal the ball again and again.  

Group Pup-Dates. If you're meeting up with friends for some outdoor fun, don't forget to bring your pooch, too. You and your pals can break a sweat chasing your pets around, and the pups will get to expel some energy, socialize with their fellow pup-letes and create their own canine games.

Fetch Takes the Field. Give your usual game of fetch a soccer spin by kicking a soccer ball outside while your pup chases after it. He'll love chasing after the moving target.

Nama-Sit, Nama-Stay. Recent studies have found that owning a dog has an array of health benefits for both the minds and bodies of dog owners. Try out a relaxing and fun bonding experience with your four-legged friend by practicing the art of "doga" (dog yoga). At the very least, you'll have fun trying new poses with your pup.

Race to the Finish. Let your pup run at top speed to see if he can beat you in a foot race. You might need to just let him win, especially if he has tiny legs.

Walk It Out. At the end of the day, there's nothing like a good, old-fashioned walk. Keep it fun and interesting for you and your pup by taking walks outside of your neighborhood every once in a while. Find a new trail or a local lake to stroll around. Your puppy will love taking in all the new sights and smells.

Source: Pedigree

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Safety Tips for the Summertime Grill Master

June 6, 2017 12:36 am

Summer is the season for grilling. However, an average of 8,900 home fires involving grills, hibachis, or barbecues occur each year in the United States. In 2014, 16,600 patients went to emergency rooms due to injuries involving grills, and 1,600 children under age five suffered thermal burns, caused by touching a hot surface. Safety aside, drilling-related fires cause about $118 million in property damage each year.

Clearly, it’s important to keep safety in the forefront when enjoying all that your grill has to offer.

Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller and Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency Director Richard Flinn off the following tips to keep your family safe when grilling out.

- Keep the grill well away from your home and deck railings, and out from under eaves and overhanging branches.

- Remove grease or fat buildup from the grill and in trays below the grill.

- Never leave your grill unattended, and keep children and pets at least three feet away from the grill at all times.

- Always make sure the lid of a gas grill is open before lighting.

- If using starter fluid for a charcoal grill, use only charcoal starter fluid, and never add charcoal fluid or any other flammable liquid to the fire.  Keep charcoal fluid out of the reach of children and away from heat sources.

- If your charcoal grill has an electric starter, use an extension cord.

- When finished grilling, let the coals cool completely, then dispose in a metal container.

Source: www.insurance.pa.gov and the National Fire Protection Association.  .

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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15 Safety Tips for Summer Fun

June 6, 2017 12:36 am

While summer is the season for fun, fun, fun, as more Americans hit the road, the pool and the park this season, it’s important to keep yourself and your family safe.

Read on for a variety of summer safety tips from the Red Cross:

On the road

- Be well-rested and alert, use your seat belts, observe speed limits and follow the rules of the road. Clean your headlights and turn them on as dusk approaches and always have them on during inclement weather.

- Don't drink and drive. Have a designated driver available.Give your full attention to the road. Avoid distractions such as cell phones or the radio.

- Use caution in work zones – both for your safety and those of the workers!

- Don't follow other vehicles too closely.

In the water

- Do your part, be water smart! Ensure that everyone in the family learns to swim well.

- Keep a close eye and constant attention on children and adults while at the beach.

- Don't fool with a pool: fence it in. Enclose your pool and spa with four-sided, four-foot fencing and use self-closing, self-latching gates.  

- Don't just pack it; wear your U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket – always when on a boat and if in a situation beyond your skill level. Inflatable children's toys and water wings can be fun, but they are no substitute for a life jacket and close adult supervision.

- Swim as a pair near a lifeguard's chair - everyone, including experienced swimmers, should swim with a buddy in areas protected by lifeguards.

At the grill

- Always supervise a barbecue grill when in use. Don't add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited.

- Never grill indoors – not in your house, camper, tent, or any enclosed area.

- Make sure everyone, including the pets, stays away from the grill.

- Keep the grill out in the open, away from the house, the deck, tree branches, or anything that could catch fire.

- Use long-handled tools especially made for cooking on the grill to keep the chef safe.

Source: The Red Cross

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Family Safety During Hurricane Season

June 2, 2017 12:30 am

When a hurricane hits, it’s important to stay connected to your loved ones. But when the power goes down, this can be difficult. To help prep for potential hurricanes, keep the following tech tips in mind, courtesy of AT&T:

Keep your mobile phone battery charged. In case of a power outage, have another way to charge your phone like an extra battery, car charger or device-charging accessory. Applicable sales tax holidays are a great time to stock up on cell phone accessories.

Keep your mobile devices dry. The biggest threat to your device during a hurricane is water.  Keep it safe from the elements by storing it in a baggie or some other type of protective covering, like an Otterbox phone cover.

Have a family communications plan. Choose someone out of the area as a central contact.   Make sure all family members know who to contact if they get separated. Most importantly, practice your emergency plan in advance.

Program all of your emergency contact numbers and e-mail addresses into your mobile phone. Numbers should include the police department, fire station and hospital, as well as your family members.

Forward your home number to your mobile number in the event of an evacuation. Call forwarding is based out of the telephone central office. This means you will get calls from your landline phone even if your local telephone service is disrupted. If the central office is not operational, services such as voicemail and call forwarding may be useful.

Track the storm and access weather information on your mobile device. Many homes lose power during severe weather. You can stay up to speed as a DIRECTV customer, by streaming local weather channels using the DIRECTV application on your smartphone. If you subscribe to mobile DVR, you can also stream every channel directly to your phone.

Camera phones provide assistance. If you have a camera phone, take, store and send photos and video clips of damage to your insurance company.

Use location-based technology. Services like AT&T Navigator and AT&T FamilyMap can help you find evacuation routes or avoid traffic from downed trees or power lines. They can also track a family member's wireless device if you get separated.

Limit social media activity. Keep social media activity to a minimum during and after a storm to limit network congestion and allow for emergency communications to go through.

Source: At&T

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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