RE/MAX 440
Peter Cerruti
440 South West End Blvd, RT 309
Quakertown  PA 18951
 Phone: 215-429-7273
Office Phone: 215-538-4400
Fax: 267-354-6992 
petecerruti@yahoo.com
Search for Properties
Peter Cerruti

My Blog

Summer Safety: Lawn Mower Edition

June 20, 2013 4:41 am

In just a few weeks the school year will come to a close and thousands of children across the country will take on a familiar chore: Mowing the lawn. Safety is always a priority, and three national medical organizations are warning families that the routine task of lawn mowing can be extremely dangerous to children, the operator, and those nearby if proper safety precautions aren't taken.

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), in 2012 more than 234,000 people were treated for lawn mower-related injuries in a clinic or emergency department, or were admitted to the hospital. More than 17,900 of them are children under age 18, and approximately one-third of lawn mower-related injuries are serious enough to be treated in an emergency department.

"Every year at this time, children can be seen operating or playing around lawn mowers in unsafe ways. In thousands of yards, injuries will occur, and a beautiful summer day will become a painful occasion," says American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) President Thomas K. McInerny, MD, FAAP. "We want parents and kids to be more aware of precautions to take so that injuries can be prevented."

Lawn mower injury prevention tips include:

• Only use a mower with a control that stops the mower blade from moving if the handle is let go.
• Children should be at least 12 years of age before operating a push lawn mower, and age 16 to operate a driving lawn mower.
• Make sure that sturdy shoes (not sandals or sneakers) are worn while mowing.
• Prevent injuries from flying objects, such as stones or toys, by picking up objects from the lawn before mowing begins. Have anyone who uses a mower or is in the vicinity to wear polycarbonate protective eyewear at all times.
• Do not pull the mower backward or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary, and carefully look for children behind you when you mow in reverse.
• Always turn off the mower and wait for the blades to stop completely before removing the grass catcher, unclogging the discharge chute, inspecting or repairing lawn mower equipment or crossing gravel paths, roads, or other areas.
• Use a stick or broom handle (not your hands or feet) to remove debris in lawn mowers.
• Do not allow children to ride as passengers on ride-on mowers and keep children out of the yard while mowing.
• Drive up and down slopes, not across to prevent mower rollover.
• Keep lawn mowers in good working order. When using a lawn mower for the first time in a season, have it serviced to ensure that it is working correctly.

Source: OrthoInfo.org

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Choosing a Cruise Line Can be as Important as Choosing Your Cruise Destination

June 20, 2013 4:41 am

As the summer cruise season approaches, cruise customers should take a closer look at not just cruise routes and destinations, but the cruise lines themselves.

"Most cruise customers are looking for not just a cruise, but an experience," said Deana Crouch, director of vacation sales for Adelman Vacations. "Some customers are young and single, some are retired couples, and many are families with children. Many of the cruise ships are massive in size, but still, they can't be all things to all people."

Crouch said that pictures of large, sleek cruise ships tend to give the impression that all cruise ships are the same. "Ships come in all sizes, shapes and designs – sometimes to accommodate the type of cruise and sometimes to accommodate the waters they navigate," she said. "For example, some river cruises may be limited to 100 or so passengers, where some Caribbean and trans-Atlantic cruise ships can carry over 5,000.”

The last 10-15 years has seen a large increase in family cruise vacations. "Some of the cruise lines focus on only family cruises," said Crouch. "They've done a good job of developing fun experiences for moms and dads and children of all ages – and helping families to connect through their cruise experience."

Crouch said although summertime is popular, there is no such thing as a single cruise season. "Cruises are global – they're on every ocean and designed for all seasons and occasions. "For instance, if you're looking for a scenic cruise in Alaska, go in the summertime. Many historic destinations are also only open in the spring and summer. But if you're looking for a tropical paradise, you may enjoy it more if you go in January or February."

Potential cruisers might want to consider booking their vacation through an experienced travel agent. "We often have access to unadvertised specials, and can help customers get extras like shipboard credits, spa credits and upgrades. Also, if a customer has any kind of an issue, we become their advocates," said Crouch.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Savvy Money Tips to Share with Your Teen

June 20, 2013 4:41 am

(Family Features) — Most parents have learned things about money they wish they had known at a younger age. But when it comes to broaching the topic with their own teenagers, about a third would rather talk to them about smoking, drugs and bullying than money. Parents can take the angst out of teaching money management by working it into everyday routines.

“Your kids are most likely interested in money and having more of it, but they may not know where to start,” says Susan Ehrlich, president of financial services for H&R Block. “Teaching money skills before they graduate will help them make smart choices and learn from their financial missteps now, so they’re better prepared when they’re on their own.”

Here are some tips about talking to your teen about finances:

Encourage learning by earning. You may or may not want your teen to hold down a job while in high school, but you can instill the concept of earning by encouraging occasional paying projects, such as babysitting or mowing lawns.

Practice makes perfect. Ask your teen to manage a portion of the family budget, such as writing the weekly menu and grocery list to fit your budget or keeping track of eating-out expenses every month.

Save now, spend later. Open a savings account for your teen to plan for future purchases. If you’re able, offer to match a portion of their savings to encourage the behavior. This can help convey the difference between needs and wants. Verbalize your own wants for something the entire family can save for and enjoy together, then share your progress toward the goal.

Set some limits. If your teen has a credit card, set a realistic credit limit so the balance can be paid in full each month. Your teen will also see the impact of interest rates and annual fees.

Be a good financial role model. Pay your own bills on time and ask your teen to be part of the process. Talk to your teen about the importance of a good credit score and how to maintain it – for example, paying your bills on time accounts for 35 percent of your score. Help them understand lower credit scores mean higher interest that could cost thousands of unnecessary dollars.

Source: H&R Block Dollars & Sense

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

The Pros of Rainwater Harvesting

June 20, 2013 4:41 am

For centuries, people have collected rainwater for drinking, washing and irrigation purposes. With the advent of municipal water treatment, rainwater collection became less popular in urbanized centers, though water storage cisterns can still be found in old farmhouses across Canada. But recently, rainwater harvesting has experienced an increase in popularity in countries around the globe as a result of droughts, water shortages and the rising costs of drinking water and storm water infrastructure. Canada, too, is experiencing an increase in rainwater harvesting for lawn and garden irrigation, and many municipalities have begun to offer rebates for rain barrels. But larger, more sophisticated systems that capture, store, treat and redirect greater quantities of rainwater for other uses are still relatively new.

Rainwater harvesting systems use rainwater collected from the roof and should not be confused with systems that recycle treated wastewater or greywater (water from baths, showers and laundry). Rainwater that has touched the ground is generally not collected, as it can be contaminated with leaked automobile fluids, road salt, pet droppings, pesticides, fertilizers and dirt.

Some municipal planning codes now permit the use of non-potable (not safe to drink) water for toilet flushing and subsurface irrigation, while others permit the use of rainwater for laundry washing. Codes and bylaws will set out requirements for the appropriate materials to be used, sizing, supports, protection and marking, as well as the steps needed to ensure that non-potable water does not mix with potable (drinkable) water from the municipality or your well. Before installing a rainwater harvesting system, it is important to check with your municipality first to ensure the design and installation of your system will be in compliance with local regulations.

Depending on what you wish to use your rainwater for, your system can range from very small and simple to large and complex, with the cost varying accordingly. A general rule of thumb is that your system will cost $1/liter so that smaller 2,000 liter systems will cost around $2,000.

The first step will be to determine the quantity of water you will need for your intended purposes, the size of your roof catchment area and the amount of rainfall your area typically receives in a year. Based on this information, a rainwater harvesting system designer can work with you to determine how much rain you can realistically collect, how big of a cistern you will need and what you can use this water for. Cisterns have come a long way from the simple rain barrel. They come in different sizes (50 - 200,000 L), shapes (rectangular, square, cylindrical, bag) and materials (concrete, fibreglass, plastic, steel, wood) and can be installed above or below ground. Cisterns and related components should be insulated or emptied to avoid freezing in the winter months.

While there are currently very few regulations for rainwater quality, a rainwater harvesting system can include some level of treatment to stop the system from clogging up and to help ensure good water quality. Gutter filters, screens and systems that divert the "first flush" of rainwater are used to reduce the amount of leaf litter, insects, pollens, dust and other pollutants that can collect on roofs and get into the rainwater system. Screens are also used on access openings on the cistern to keep out insects, rodents, etc. Stored rainwater can also be treated with cartridge or membrane filters and then disinfected with chlorine or ultraviolet light prior to use. Check with your local health agency to determine what treatment (if any) is required in your jurisdiction. Once installed, it will be necessary to maintain your system as per the manufacturer's instructions to ensure optimal performance. It is important to inspect and clean out gutters, check filters and check for leaks at least once a year.

In most cases, you will need a pump to deliver the treated rainwater from the cistern to the garden or your house. It is important to ensure that all plumbing and piping for the distribution system are adequately sized and installed for optimal flow. Consideration must be given to redirecting excess rain to a soakaway pit or infiltration trench to prevent the cistern from overflowing during heavy storm periods. Consider having your system designed, installed and commissioned by a professional.

Rainwater harvesting systems offer an effective way to reduce your water bills, use plant-friendly water in your garden and reduce your demands on local water infrastructure. To learn more about rainwater harvesting systems, visit www.cmhc.ca.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

What Happens When Interest Rates Rise?

June 20, 2013 4:41 am

Freddie Mac released its U.S. Economic and Housing Market Outlook for June showing the effects rising interest rates are having on certain markets around the country and the overall housing recovery.

• Interest rates for 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages have risen about 0.5 percentage points over the past several weeks and are expected to hover around 4.0 percent during the second half of 2013.

• With rising mortgage rates, expect a sharp decline in refinance volume in the second half of this year; refinance originations are expected to total about $1.1 trillion in 2013, down from $1.5 trillion in 2012.

• At today's house prices and income levels, mortgage rates would have to be nearly 7 percent before the U.S. median priced home would be unaffordable to a family making the median income in most parts of the country.

"The recent upturn in interest rates is sparking fears among some that the nascent economic and housing recoveries will be choked off before they produce sustained growth. However, with the exception of high-cost markets, which are already challenged with affordability, house prices in most of the country are very affordable,” said Frank Nothaft, Freddie Mac vice president and chief economist. “So while rising interest rates will reduce housing demand, rates would have to increase considerably more before the reduction in demand for home purchases would be substantial. Nothing in the recent trends suggests that we need to fear a major slowdown. A gradual rise in interest rates will not derail the recovery, and are an indication that the overall economic situation is improving."

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Stay Safe This Summer: BBQ Safety Tips

June 12, 2013 2:08 am

According to the National Fire Prevention Association there are 5,000 outside BBQ grill fires annually that require fire departments to respond. And there are another 3,600 BBQ grill fires that cause damage to the structure of homes.

Here are some quick tips to help you enjoy a safe BBQ grilling season:

1. Before you use your BBQ grill:

• Repair any damaged energy supply connections such as gas tanks, hoses and electrical connections.
• Replace any corroded BBQ grill parts.

2. Locate your BBQ grill a safe distance from your home, wooden deck and anything flammable. Always keep your BBQ grill in a place where children are not playing. Your Operator's Manual should give you an explanation on proper BBQ grill placement.

3. Always follow the lighting instructions in the operator's manual that came with your BBQ grill.

4. Never leave a BBQ grill unattended and have a fire extinguisher close by.

5. Clean your BBQ grill regularly
to remove grease. Grease can cause flare-ups that can be deadly.

And before you fire-up your BBQ grill for the 2013 season, be sure to check and remove any rodent nests, spider webs and other debris that might affect the safe operation of your BBQ grill.

Source: The BBQ Cleaner

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Don't Get Stung Rushing into A Pest Control Contract

June 12, 2013 2:08 am

Not to be a pest, but I recently discovered a very big ant problem involving very small ants. And while the change of season apparently diverted their attention from the cupboard to the more diverse and easy to access bounty of the great outdoors, the prospect of calling in a pest control service was pretty daunting.

The regional Better Business Bureau apparently hears from a lot of nervous pending pest control clients, because the agency just issued a punch list of warnings to ensure you don't get stung by unscrupulous pest management services. In 2012, more than 786,000 people turned to Better Business Bureau for information on pest control services.

BBB and NPMA recommend the following tips for finding a qualified pest management professional:

Check them out - Evaluate pest control professionals and companies that are members of national, state or local associations. Ask friends and neighbors to recommend pest control companies they have used successfully and ask how satisfied they were with the service.

Always deal with a qualified and licensed pest management company - Ask to see the license or other credentials of the pest control professional that comes to solve your pest problem.

Don’t rush - If a sizable amount of money is involved, get bids from several pest management companies.

Understand before you sign - Before signing a contract, be sure to fully understand the nature of the household pest to be exterminated, the extent of the infestation, and the work necessary to solve the problem. Find out if the pest control company has liability insurance to cover any damages to your house or furnishings during treatment.

If a guarantee is given, know what it covers, how long it lasts, what you must do to keep it in force, and what kind of continuing control, prevention and management are necessary.

Don’t fall for high-pressure sales tactics - Buy value, not price. Beware of companies that offer bargains that sound too good to be true. Be wary of companies that come to your home uninvited and offer to give your house a free inspection for pests or press you for immediate and/or costly treatments.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Finance Tips for First-Time Homebuyers

June 12, 2013 2:08 am

According to a recent PulteGroup Home Index Survey, more than half of renters aged 18-34 say their intention to buy a home has increased in the last year. While their intentions are in many ways driven by personal, aspirational reasons – more space, family stability and the pride of homeownership – the low mortgage rate environment, increasing rental costs and scarcity of desirable rental options makes homeownership an even more attractive proposition for many.

"The propensity for young adults to test the waters of homeownership continues to increase and has become more evident as renters are seeing the overall value of owning a home," said Deborah Wahl, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at PulteGroup, Inc., noting that more than 50 percent of millennials reported that the desire to own/build equity was the primary reason for purchasing a new home. "However, beyond finances, it is important for potential buyers to take several other factors into consideration."

Here are a few tips for first-time homebuyers looking for the right housing match:

• Know Your Financial Situation – Start saving for a down payment and talk with mortgage lenders about available loans well in advance of your purchase. Understand there are special federal, state and locally administered financial programs for new homebuyers, such as FHA and HUD loan programs. Additionally, it's important to take into account other factors beyond your mortgage, including homeowners insurance and property taxes. By doing your homework, you will know what you can afford and comfortably make a decision about this important investment.

• Compare Owning vs. Renting – Buying can be smarter than renting from a financial standpoint, but it has other advantages, as well. Owning a home provides you with a great deal of freedom and decision-making autonomy. No more will you have to worry about the noisy neighbor upstairs or accidental scratches on the wall from decorations. You'll have the power to select paint colors and plant flowers throughout the yard. Also, houses tend to offer more storage space.

• Weigh New vs. Used – If you want to choose the floor plan and customize a home to fit your needs and lifestyle, building a new home may be the right choice for you. Popular options new homes offer today include more open, larger spaces, master bedroom suites, island-centric kitchens and bigger outdoor living space. Customizing a new home also provides the opportunity to design your home and include amenities that meet the needs of your growing family – if that's in your future. Additionally, new homes can be up to 30 percent more energy efficient and often come with a builder warranty. If you're handy and don't mind a fixer upper, resale can be an attractive route as well.

• Examine the Location – Consider your surroundings when deciding where you want to live next. If you plan to start a family, research the local school district and other family offerings such as nearby parks and community centers. For fun, test out the local retail scene and entertainment options to see if it caters to your lifestyle. If you're a commuter, determine if the area is supported by adequate public transportation or provides easy access to major highways. Many in the housing market also care about ensuring they still live within close proximity to family and friends, as only 21 percent of homeowners are willing to move away from their families.

• Select the Right Builder – If you decide on a new home, select a builder who has experience in the type of home and in the location you want. Make sure they have a history of building quality homes and are financially stable. Moreover, how easy are they to work with? Some builders today have gone digital to enhance customer service and help buyers stay on top of the latest with their new home. Look for online design centers that can help you make important design decisions, for example, or portals in which you can stay up-to-date on how your new home is progressing. Lastly, take time to check their references and talk to past customers.

• Confide in Trusted Sources – More than 90 percent of home shoppers today are plugged into the internet and use it as their main source of information. While this is particularly true with millennials, don't forget to seek advice from two trusted groups: real estate agents and your personal network, including your parents. Approximately 60 percent of millennials say they would rely on both sources, as each has extensive experience in purchasing homes and can provide personal guidance toward the successful purchase of their home.

"With third-party data showing that 90 percent of millennials plan to purchase a home at some point in their lives, it's important first-time homebuyers have access to the right tools and information to ensure their first home purchase is one they are proud of for years to come," added Wahl. "With many options to choose from, starting from a point of knowledge will go a long way towards achieving their dream of homeownership."

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Increasing Mosquito Prevention Curbs West Nile and Other Diseases

June 12, 2013 2:08 am

Health officials all over the country warn about the West Nile Virus throughout the hot summer months. Rain and summer heat waves are prime breeding grounds for mosquitoes, which can spread the West Nile Virus, dengue fever, encephalitis, canine heartworm and other diseases.

Because mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water, Health Department officials are asking everyone to take steps to reduce standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying. To reduce mosquito populations:

• Drain water from garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flower pots or any other containers where sprinkler or rain water has collected.
• Remove and discard old tires, drums, bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items left outdoors that can collect water.
• Empty and clean birdbaths and pet water bowls at least once or twice a week.
• Protect boats and vehicles from rain with tarps that don’t accumulate water.
• Maintain swimming pools in good condition with appropriate chlorination. Empty kids’ swimming pools when not in use.

Where standing water collects, use a product with all-natural Bti to disrupt mosquitoes’ breeding cycle. The Bti in a Mosquito Dunk will kill mosquito larvae in birdbaths, ponds, animal watering troughs and other standing water before they become biting, disease-carrying adults. Mosquito Dunks are safe for pets, wildlife and fish, and they are approved for organic use.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags:

Fatherly Tips for Raising Healthy, Successful Kids

June 12, 2013 2:08 am

(Family Features) Everyone knows the classic love story. Man and woman fall in love, get married, have a baby and live happily ever after. However, real life isn’t always the fairy tale. While today’s version of the modern family has changed over time, the importance of parental involvement in children’s lives has not.

However, one out of every three American children (about 24 million) lives in a home without their biological father. According to research by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (or CASA), these children are more likely use drugs and experience educational, health, emotional and behavioral problems.

“Having both biological parents active in a child’s life has proven to have a positive effect on both the child’s social development and academic achievement,” says Dr. Janet Taylor, an author and community psychiatrist in the New York City area who frequently counsels families.

For kids, growing up in an environment where both parents are involved is important to their long-term development, health and well-being. Dr. Taylor provides the following advice for dads on how they can stay active in their child’s life, even if they are not the primary caregiver.

Share meals together: According research by CASA, children who share regular meals with their parents earn better grades in school than those who do not. Set a goal to share a meal with your child at least two days per week. Dinner doesn’t have to be elaborate. The focus should be on communication.

Plan fun activities: No matter where you go or how much money you spend, every moment spent with your child is a chance to create positive memories. Set aside time to celebrate your kids’ accomplishments and special occasions. This will increase the child’s confidence and encourage them to keep trying.

Get involved at school: Fathers are a positive force in their children's education. According to a study by the National Center for Education Statistics, when fathers get involved in their child’s education, the child is more likely to get good grades, enjoy school and participate in extracurricular activities.

Source: Identigene

Published with permission from RISMedia.


Tags: