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Peter Cerruti
440 South West End Blvd, RT 309
Quakertown  PA 18951
 Phone: 215-429-7273
Office Phone: 215-538-4400
Fax: 267-354-6992 
petecerruti@yahoo.com
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Peter Cerruti

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Tips for Handling the Holidays after a Divorce

December 2, 2016 12:54 am

There is no easy time to go through a divorce, but handling your first holiday alone can be extra hard. Here are three other things to remember when dealing with the holidays following divorce.

1. Think about the Children First. First and foremost, remember the children. No matter how you and your ex-spouse feel about each other, you both love your children, and they need to understand and experience this. This means that you need to keep any negative feelings towards your ex to yourself.

2. Don't Overcompensate. There is a temptation to overcompensate for a divorce by "buying your children's love" at holiday time. Trying to outdo the other parent by purchasing more or higher priced presents won't make your children love you any more; it will only confuse them and inflate your credit card bill.

3. Plan Schedules That Work. The holiday season can be demanding enough as it is; as a recently divorced single parent, it can be even more difficult. As you are planning schedules keep the children in mind. Be thoughtful about timing of transitions for the children keeping in mind traditions, sleep and meal schedules. These things are more important than making sure you and your ex have equal holiday time. Also take care of yourself. Make time to unwind and relax every day. This will help you be a better parenting during this challenging time.

Source: www.Boystown.org.

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3 Ways Soapstone Enhances Home Design

December 2, 2016 12:54 am

(Family Features)--Move over, marble and granite. There’s a new, old stone that’s coming back into vogue. After first coming into use 5,000 years ago, soapstone is once again becoming a “go-to” material for kitchen and bath designs, indoor and outdoor living spaces and more.

There are three primary reasons for the revived interest in soapstone, according to Steven Schrenk, digital media director and design consultant at Polycor, who has been working with natural stone for 22 years.

Aesthetics: One major factor driving soapstone’s appeal is shifting aesthetic trends. While designers and homeowners have been fascinated by the bright, wide range of colors and bold patterns that could be discovered in natural stone, people are coming back to a tonal, more muted palette, according to Schrenk.

Schrenk sees more designers working with textures within a similar palette of color and playing up the tactile qualities of materials and patterns within that limited palette.


“This is where soapstone plays well in pairing with these different finishes,” he said. “It tends to blend into its space and become more integrated in the whole design instead of being a separate, individual entity.”

Another aesthetic benefit of soapstone is that multiple tonalities can be achieved depending on the finishing techniques.

“It may be a cool, blue-gray color when left in its natural honed state or a deep, sultry black when waxed or enhanced,” Schrenk said. “You can go from a highly figured, dramatic statement piece to a minimal and moody silky surface in the slabs that are neutral without veining.”

Function: When it comes to home design, there’s no doubt that appearance is key, but so is a material’s ability to stand up to its task. Soapstone is nonporous, so it doesn’t stain. It’s softer than granite and marble, dense and heavy, but not brittle. It doesn’t chip easily, but if it does chip, it can be repaired with sandpaper. Those high-performance features make soapstone well-suited to serve numerous functions.

Versatility: “No matter how you slice it, there are 101 ways to style soapstone; whereas with some other materials, there are more limitations,” Schrenk said.

Because of the stone’s ability to absorb and radiate heat, it can be used for unique items, such as pizza ovens and foot warmers, says Glenn Bowman, owner of Vermont Soapstone. He has also seen soapstone used in a variety of everyday applications, both indoors and outdoors, including tiles, flooring, backsplashes, sinks and a variety of custom stonework.

Source: usenaturalstone.com. 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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5 Smart Strategies to Settle an Estate

December 1, 2016 12:54 am

(Family Features)--When a parent passes away, it’s usually left to their offspring to manage and disperse the remaining estate. In the wake of such a loss, emotions can run high, and the sheer amount of paperwork can quickly become overwhelming.

If you’re in the throes of settling an estate, whether by yourself or with the assistance of your siblings, consider these tips to help chart a smoother course.

Get organized. Keep a seemingly endless to-do list manageable by writing everything down. Create a system for prioritizing each task and if there are others who are willing to help, delegate what you can. Establish categories such as bills to pay and other outstanding debts, accounts to close, agencies and organizations that need to be notified of the death and so on.

Know your limits. Some estates are simple and straightforward: There’s a basic will, few assets, known heirs, and it’s easy to grasp what happens next. Others are far more complicated. If you find yourself in over your head, seek help from an expert such as an estate attorney who can guide you through the legalities and paperwork.

Expect the unexpected. It may come in the form of a change in the will or old letters stashed in a closet, but it’s a safe bet that in settling the estate, you’ll come across something you weren’t expecting. Add this to the emotional simmer you’ve been holding steady and this may be the tipping point to boil you over. Simply put the new information on the back burner for now and return to it later, when you can deal with it more rationally and avoid letting a surprise stain your memories.

Take a break. In the aftermath of a loss, many survivors switch to autopilot, not only to distract their minds from the loss but to regain some sense of control in a situation that can feel helpless. While this coping mechanism may answer a short-term need, be sure to allow yourself time to properly grieve and avoid taking on so much that you neglect your own physical needs, such as food and sleep.

Settling a loved one’s estate isn’t likely to be easy, but taking it all one step at a time will help you take care of business while you make sure you’re still taking care of yourself.

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Are You Purchasing Safe Gifts For Your Kids?

December 1, 2016 12:54 am

When choosing gifts for your child or the children of a loved one, it's important you keep safety front and center. Below are a few helpful tips.

- When buying toys like skateboards, bikes and scooters, make sure you also purchase all necessary safety equipment.

- Choose toys suitable to the child's age. Pay mind to age labels, which have more to do with the safety of the toy's contents (sharp or tiny pieces) than with your child's ability to figure the toy out.

- Skip toys with small magnetic pieces for any child under age 6 or under age 10 if they have younger siblings who could easily access the pieces.

- Look for well-made toys.

- Avoid toys that produce loud noises. High-volume games can permanently impair a child's hearing, and loud sounds can frighten a younger child. Also, you're going to need to listen to those noises until your child tires of the toy, so do yourself a favor and opt for silent play things.

- Avoid toys painted with lead paint. Exposure to lead can result in lead poisoning, causing serious damage to a child's brain, kidneys and nervous system.

- Avoid electrical toys with heating elements (batteries, electrical plugs) for children under the age of 8. These toys are a potential burn hazard.

- Avoid toys with strings, straps or cords longer than 7 inches, which can wrap around a child's neck and accidentally strangle him or her.

- Immediately discard plastic wrappings on toys before they become dangerous play things for young children.

Source: www.baycare.org.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Finance Tips for Young Parents

December 1, 2016 12:54 am

As a young parent, you may just be learning about all the responsibilities parenthood requires. When it comes to financial planning, setting your sight on the future can help immensely.

Demolish debt. Slaying your own debt will positively impact your family's financial future. While it may take years to pay off those student loans or credit card debt, creating a plan can help. Tackle your lowest balance first to gain momentum then take on the next smallest. Additionally, pay attention to higher interest rates that are costing you a lot of money.

Build a budget. Creating a budget doesn't have to be hard. There are many budgeting apps available on the market to help you track your expenses, or you can try the trusty envelope system with monthly allowances for groceries, entertainment, utilities, etc.

Build an emergency fund. Setting a fund for potential emergencies will never backfire. Aim for a small, achievable goal as low as $500 then set the bar higher. Participate in your employer-sponsored savings program to boost retirement savings, especially if there is a match. Make it an automatic payroll deduction and increase it when your paycheck goes up. As far as your child's college savings, save what you can, when you can. Every little bit will help when education bills come due.

Child care. Consider establishing a flexible spending account if one is offered by your employer. Parents can use pretax dollars to pay up to $5,000 in child care expenses in most states.

Review insurance and important paperwork. Create a will either by using an online program or hiring a professional to name your child's guardian, and designate at what age any payouts, savings or investments will be distributed. With health insurance, notify your employer within 30 days of the birth to ensure that the child is eligible for any dependent benefits. Purchase appropriate health care coverage to protect your family. Review your employer's life insurance plan and determine if it is adequate for your needs. If not, consider purchasing additional life insurance.

Source: SmartAboutMoney.org.

 

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Know the Signs of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

December 1, 2016 12:54 am

Carbon monoxide poison is a silent danger that claims over 400 lives in the U.S. Annually, as well as over 20,000 visits to the emergency room, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

To keep your family safe, know the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning:

- Headaches
- Nausea
- Vomiting
- Dizziness
- Shortness of breath
- Fatigue

"Safety is our top priority at DTE Energy, and we urge residents to be particularly alert to carbon monoxide danger during the fall and winter heating season. It's when CO exposure most frequently occurs," says Brad Burcz, senior safety and health engineer, DTE Energy.  "One of the best defenses against CO poisoning is to install a carbon monoxide alarm near all sleeping areas in your home. If dangerous levels of CO are detected, an audible alarm will alert you."

DTE offers the following tips to prevent CO poisoning in homes and businesses:

- For businesses, install carbon monoxide alarms in main areas away from vents and appliances or equipment that produce smoke or steam.

- Replace batteries in CO alarms annually.

- If a CO alarm is activated, or the presence of carbon monoxide is suspected, immediately get out of the house or building into fresh air, and if necessary, seek medical attention.

- Ensure all fuel-burning appliances are operating and venting properly. 

- Get an annual furnace inspection by a licensed professional.

- Check yearly to verify flues, vents and chimneys are connected, in good condition and clear of debris.

Source: dteenergy.com

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5 Easy Steps for a Cleaner Home

December 1, 2016 12:54 am

(Family Features)--Whether it is a family dinner after a long day at work, sitting down with a book on a rainy day or entertaining friends during the weekend, there is nothing like spending quality time in the comfort of your own home. With a few simple steps, you can have a fresher, cleaner and healthier home, taking comfort to a whole new level.

Leave your shoes at the door. The bottoms of shoes can track bacteria and chemicals into the home from the outdoors that you may not notice. Create a designated station near the front door to drop shoes off – this can serve as a reminder for your family as they walk in, and guests will hopefully follow suit when they arrive.

Disinfect the handles on doors and appliances. Viruses and bacteria can live on indoor surfaces for several hours, and sometimes even days. Get into the habit of wiping down doorknobs and handles, especially in the bathroom, with disinfectant each night or after use to limit the spread of germs around the house.

Use natural cleaning products. Common household cleaning products leave chemicals lingering in the air long after the cleaning is over. Opt for greener methods that get the job done without compromising the air you breathe. There are dozens of DIY recipes to create natural cleaners on your own, such as an all-purpose cleaner made of one part baking soda, two parts vinegar and two parts water, not only making for a healthier home, but also saving you money.

Check your air filter every 30 days. Every breath is a reason to care about your air, and more time spent at home can stir up indoor allergens like pet dander and dust.

Expose textiles to heat. Just because your sheets are odor-free and the curtains are stain-free doesn’t mean that the fabrics are free of dust mites or other bacteria. Tackle hidden germs by washing your bedding in hot water each week and throwing your pillows and curtains in the dryer for at least 30 minutes.

For more ways to make your home happy and healthy, visit Filtrete.com.  

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Cold, Bronchitis or Pneumonia? How to Tell the Difference

December 1, 2016 12:54 am

When illness hits hard, it can be hard to differentiate symptoms—especially when you're curled up in bed. However, it is important people are aware of the differences between a cold, bronchitis and pneumonia so that you know when to seek professional help.

- Colds may be characterized by a clear runny nose, cough, and a low-grade or lack of fever. While it is one of the most common infectious diseases, it is usually mild and resolves without treatment.

- Bronchitis happens when air passages are inflamed. Possible symptoms may include: a frequent cough with mucus, wheezing, fever, and a lack of energy. Brought on by a viral infection, acute bronchitis is more prevalent of the two basic types. Chronic bronchitis is a cough that lasts 2 to 3 months annually, for at least two years—typically caused by smoking.

- Pneumonia produces fluid in the lungs due to an infection. Symptoms may include a cough, fever and difficulty breathing. Older adults, babies and people with other illnesses may need to be hospitalized for treatment.

Source: USA Medical, ABC 4 Utah

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Lesser-Known Jobs That Pay $100,000 or More

November 28, 2016 12:54 am

You don’t need to work on Wall Street, or be a doctor or lawyer, to earn a hundred grand a year or more, says the research team at Glassdoor.com, a site focused on careers.

Lesser-known jobs that pay over $100,000 annually include:

Special agent – Whether you work for law enforcement or a private corporation, people who examine criminal trends and propose crime deterrent strategies can earn a median of $125,000. Qualified candidates should have law enforcement or military backgrounds plus a degree in criminal justice.   

Airline pilot – In addition to ably handling a plane, pilots need to oversee crews and be savvy communicators. Candidates must be certified with an Airline Transport Pilot License and hold a bachelor’s degree in aviation or have served in the military. Median salary is $134,000.

Regional sales executive - Successful sales executives need to be well-versed in their company’s products and acutely aware of customer needs. Stellar communicators – with or without a college degree – earn a median income of $103,500.

Nurse practitioners – Those with a master’s degree in nursing can earn a median of $106,300. They will perform physical exams, treat common injuries and illnesses, and prescribe some medications.

Reservoir engineer – These professionals identify and pursue oil and gas reserves underground.  The goal is to extract the maximum amount of energy without over-tapping the reservoir. Those with a degree in chemical engineering – and some experience in the field – can earn a median of $143,000.

Equity research associate – Qualified candidates with a bachelor’s degree in finance, economics or similar use financial models to analyze and report on financial trends. The job incorporates the excitement of investment banking but is less demanding, and commands a median salary of $100,000.

Geophysicist – Geophysicists study the earth using gravity, seismic, electrical and magnetic methods. Some study how the earth is changing while others locate valuable minerals beneath its surface. Requires a bachelor’s or a master’s degree in geology and pays a median $119,380.

Software architect – They take the lead in communicating about system developments with the company’s leadership. Most candidates have at least a bachelor’s degree in math, software engineering, or similar, although some acquire the right skills through an online coding boot camp or another accelerated online program. Long hours pay off with a median salary of $116,500.

Published with permission from RISMedia.


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Creating Healthy Food Habits for Your Kids

November 28, 2016 12:54 am

(Family Features)--More than nine in 10 millennial moms think it's important for their kids to learn about where their food comes from, and more than three-quarters of those moms actively do things with their kids to help learn just that, according to recent findings.

Building healthy habits is the top reason moms cite for encouraging more learning when it comes to food, according to research conducted by IPSOS on behalf of Cuties – the sweet little clementines. Even when the weather is colder outside, these tips make it fun for families to learn about where their food comes from and help encourage kids to eat healthy for a lifetime.

Grocery shop together or go to a farmers market. Many cities now have year-round indoor markets, where together you can select fruits and veggies to try. Often the farmers are there, so you can learn about produce and get ideas for how to prepare unfamiliar items at home.

Cook with your kids. Find fun recipes that let them explore fresh foods where they can be creative. Find age-appropriate ways to involve them, like stirring or measuring, and encourage them to get hands-on with recipes, such as this fun Flower Salad recipe from registered dietitian Ellie Krieger.

Explore the story of where some of their favorite foods come from. Kids learn and remember information when it comes in the form of a story. Cuties is giving families the chance to uncover those stories by encouraging them to submit questions using #AskAGrower on Facebook. Actual growers will answer with stories about how this sweet, seedless and easy-to-peel fruit is grown with care by their family of growers. A video series at cutiescitrus.com/our-story also helps bring the stories to life.

Source: cutiescitrus.com

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